Author Topic: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project  (Read 10283 times)

lolailando

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Re: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project. Please post your ideas.
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2012, 08:46:39 AM »
Vw and others are using these new gp designed as sensors. Not sure if the exist to reftrofit our trucks.
But i was extremly surprised when i took a new duratherm glowplug and read resistance and millivolts as i put the tip on a gas flame the reading went up rapidly... A bit slower going down.
They do defenetly work as a sensor i can read into the analog pins of a microcontroller
...so simple it is amazing!... I beleive the gp controler is a relay that switches of after starting the truck so reading them when the truck is running should be easy
Chevy 93 Dually, 2WD, 6.5TD, 170k, auto, banks air filter, one tank, WVO/RUG 80/20 for two weeks now in the 20-30ish F

Jhanananda

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Re: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project. Please post your ideas.
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2012, 10:24:32 AM »
From reading crossbone's posts and my general understanding of things,  the thermocouple is the junction between the heater element itself and the steel housing. The voltage differential is less as it's not designed to be a thermocouple...but it still functions as one.
Vw and others are using these new gp designed as sensors. Not sure if the exist to reftrofit our trucks.
But i was extremly surprised when i took a new duratherm glowplug and read resistance and millivolts as i put the tip on a gas flame the reading went up rapidly... A bit slower going down.
They do defenetly work as a sensor i can read into the analog pins of a microcontroller
...so simple it is amazing!... I beleive the gp controler is a relay that switches of after starting the truck so reading them when the truck is running should be easy
OK, I get it, the glow plug uses the stainless steel shield as ground, so there is going to be a disimmilar metal at the junction between the nicrome and the stainless steel housing, which could be employed as a thermocouple.  The trick would be to calibrate it, and I guess we would all consider that the calibration is going to be the same, or close enough, from engine to engine, and glow plug to glow plug.

One would want to switch off the reading when the glow plug is active.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: Data Acquisition. Microcontroler project. Please post your ideas.
« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2012, 07:05:17 AM »
I moved this thread to the Hydrocarbon thread, because I think it will be more useful there, than in the general discussion area.

I was wondering how the Data acquisition project was coming, because I am continuing to work on a distillation system, and I need to have some Data Acquisition and process control.  PID controllers are pretty cheap at about $25 each, but these cheap PID controllers are seriously limited in their programmability.

Weeder Technologies offers a very inexpensive line of Thermocouple Input Cards; Relay Output Cards; even a Frequency Counter Card, which could be used as an oscilloscope; and other I/O cards.  The software seems to be free.  I just requires a PC to run it all, so I plan to purchase some of their cards and a cheap PC laptop to drive it all.

While conducting a Google search for Data Acquisition and process control I came across Security Design Services, which has the Web X-DAQ-5I5-5.  The beauty of this device is there is no software required, and it will work on any computer, because it has its own WEB-based software built in.  This means I can use my PowerBook Pro to monitor and control distillation without having to purchase another computer, which will save money in the short term, but I may find I need to dedicate a computer to distillation anyway.

Control by Web X-DAQ-5I5-5 5 Input Data Acquisition Module
Your Price: $115.95

The same company has a Control by Web X-DAQ-8A5-I Analog Input Data Acquisition Module, which I guess could be configured to read thermocouples, but their add does not say that.

Control by Web X-DAQ-8A5-I Analog Input Data Acquisition Module
Price: $269.95

Their Control by Web Remote X-WR-1R12-1I5-E IP Relay Control Module POE Powered would be for controlling the relays that power the heaters on a pyrolysis unit.

X-WR-1R12-1I5-E IP Relay Control Module POE Powered
Price: $133.95

Their The Control by Web X-DAQ-2R1-4T-5 Temperature Module looks like it have every thing needed for running a pyrolysis unit, because it provides an accurate way to remotely monitor temperatures over an IP network. It can be used for environmental temperature monitoring and simple control. Up to four digital temperature sensors can be connected and it has two internal relays which can be used to control alarm signals, heaters, fans, etc.

Control by Web X-DAQ-2R1-4T-5 Temperature Module
Your Price: $133.95

OK, so the problem with this D/A system is it relies upon Digital Temperature Sensors which are limited to a Temperature Range: -55°C to +125°C (from -10°C to +85°C) Accuracy:±0.5°C.  A pyrolysis unit needs to operate at 800F (425c).

Control by Web Digital Temperature Sensor Item Number: X-DTS-U
Your Price: $9.99
« Last Edit: November 23, 2012, 07:51:04 AM by Jhanananda »
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

lolailando

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Re: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project. Please post your ideas.
« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2012, 08:01:38 PM »
the arduino has all kind of shileds you can combine and the good thing is that there is a huge comunity to help with anything ...like linux. it has become the defacto electronic open platform (not overprized).
it may need more tinckering but a data shiled is $25
http://microcontrollershop.com/product_info.php?products_id=4526

ps: I haven't had any time to work on the project ....I have to finish a house and garage first
Chevy 93 Dually, 2WD, 6.5TD, 170k, auto, banks air filter, one tank, WVO/RUG 80/20 for two weeks now in the 20-30ish F

Jhanananda

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Re: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project. Please post your ideas.
« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2012, 06:37:39 AM »
Thanks, lolailando, for your help and for the info.  I will look closer at the arduino to see if I can use it.

From the same site you sent a link from I found the Arduino Mega R3 USB Board with ATmega2560 for only US$58.95.   

The Arduino Mega 2560 R3 board is based on an AVR ATmega2560 microcontroller running at 16MHz. The ATmega is pre-programmed with the Arduino bootloader that allows you to upload code to the ATmega2560 via USB using the open-source Arduino development environment. The ATmega2560's UART0 is connected to an ATmega16U2 USB-to-Serial converter chip, so you can connect the board to your PC via USB and download your code.

The board has 54 digital input/output pins (of which 14 can be used as PWM outputs), 16 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.

It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable, or power it with an optional AC-to-DC adapter (7V to 12V DC), or a 9V battery to get started. The Arduino Mega board is compatible with most "shields" (add-on boards) designed for the Arduino Uno, Duemilanove or Diecimila boards.

This board is R3, making it also compatible with newer Arduino shields that use additional pins. Arduino R3 adds SDA and SCL pins near the AREF pin, and two other new pins placed near the RESET pin. One is called IOREF, which allows R3 shields to adapt to the voltage provided from the board. The other new pin is not connected; it is reserved for future purposes.

Because the board features Atmel's own USB-to-Serial chip instead of an FTDI chip, there is no need for drivers under Linux or Mac (only an .inf file included with the Arduino IDE is required for Windows), and you have the ability to make the board show up as various types of devices.
About Arduino

Arduino is an open-source platform based on boards featuring an Atmel AVR microcontroller with a pre-programmed bootloader and a development environment that implements the Processing/Wiring language. Arduino can be used to develop stand-alone interactive objects or can be connected to software on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP). The open-source IDE can be downloaded for free (currently for Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux).

This just might be the way I am going to go with low cost Data Acquisition.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project. Please post your ideas.
« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2013, 06:25:40 PM »
Thanks to lolailando for pointing us in the direction of the arduino.  It looks like for the amount of money and time I dumped into PID controllers I could have bought an Arduino Mega R3 USB Board with ATmega2560 and have been a lot further along on my R&D.  Here are some Arduino development kits I found.  I am not sure which rout I am going to go in at this time.

Arduino
• Arduino microcontroller module with USB connection
• Wide variety of accessory "Shields" available
• Intended for roboticists, artists, designers and hobbyists
• Variety of I/O pins including analog, digital, PWM and more
• Based on the ATmega328 (removable DIP IC)
• Revision 3

The Arduino Uno is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 microchip. It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with an AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started.

The Uno differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip. Instead, it features the Atmega16U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter. "Uno" means one in Italian and is named to mark the upcoming release of Arduino 1.0. The Uno and version 1.0 will be the reference versions of Arduno, moving forward. The Uno is the latest in a series of USB Arduino boards, and the reference model for the Arduino platform.

The Arduino Uno can be powered via the USB connection or with an external power supply. The power source is selected automatically. External (non-USB) power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector. The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts.

The Arduino Uno can be programmed with the Arduino software. Select "Arduino Uno from the Tools > Board menu (according to the microcontroller on your board). For details, see the reference and tutorials. The ATmega328 on the Arduino Uno comes preburned with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer.
http://www.robotshop.com/arduino-uno-usb-microcontroller-rev-3.html

Terminal Adapter for Arduino Nano
This is the Gravitech Terminal Adapter for Arduino Nano. It lables for Arduino Nano version 3.0, however you can still use this adapter for the older version. Just have to remember that A0-A7 are in the reverse order. You can use this adapter to easily hook up Arduino Nano to an outside world via hook up wires.
http://www.robotshop.com/gravitech-terminal-adapter-for-arduino-nano.html

Arduino Ethernet Microcontroller (No PoE)
• ATMEGA328 Uno microcontroller with the ETH shield
• Supplied without the PoE module
• USB2SERIAL converter sold separately
• Can also be programmed using FTDI cable
Arduino introduces the Arduino Ethernet Microcontroller (No PoE). A single board that integrates the ATMEGA328 Uno microcontroller with the ETH shield. To program the board you can use a FTDI cable or the USB2SERIAL converter (A000059). You can buy it separately or in the bundle pack with it included - Arduino Ethernet Microcontroller (No PoE) + USB2SERIAL Kit (A000060). It is supplied without the PoE module. The Arduino PoE Module can be bought separately or you can choose the Arduino Ethernet board with PoE.
http://www.robotshop.com/arduino-ethernet-microcontroller-no-poe.html

Arduino Mega 2560 Microcontroller Rev3
• User friendly USB programmable Arduino Microcontroller
• Open Source design based on the larger ATmega2560
• 54 digital I/O Pins and 16 analog I/O Pins
• 256 KB of Flash Memory, 8 KB of SRAM, and 4kB of EEPROM
• Clock Speed: 16 MHz
The Arduino Mega 2560 Microcontroller Rev3 is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega2560. It has 54 digital input/output pins (of which 14 can be used as PWM outputs), 16 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started. The Mega is compatible with most shields designed for the Arduino Uno, Duemilanove, or Diecimila.
The Arduino Mega can be powered via the USB Connection or with an external power supply. The Mega2560 differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip. Instead, it features the Atmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter.

Each of the 54 digital pins on the Mega can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. It also has 16 analog inputs, each of which provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values).

The Arduino Mega2560 has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega2560 provides four hardware UARTs for TTL (5V) serial communication. An ATmega8U2 on the board channels one of these over USB and provides a virtual com port to software on the computer. Furthermore, it supports I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus; see the documentation on the Wiring website for details. For SPI communication, use the SPI library.

The Arduino Mega2560 can be programmed with the free and open source Arduino IDE hrough a USB connection without needing any extra hardware thanks to its preburnt bootloader.  You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP header.

The Arduino Mega2560 is designed to be compatible with most shields designed for the Uno, Diecimila or Duemilanove.
http://www.robotshop.com/arduino-mega-2560-microcontroller-rev3-2.html

LeafLabs Maple 32-bit Arduino Compatible Microcontroller (r5)

• Based on the STM32F103RB microprocessor
• Operating Voltage: 3.3V
• 39 digital input/output pins
• 16 analog inputs
• Integrated SPI/I2C support
The LeafLabs Maple 32-bit Arduino Compatible Microcontroller is a great way to get started with an advanced 32 bit-processor that, until now, has principally lived in the commercial domain. Take your projects to the next level with Maple’s fast clock, sophisticated interrupt architecture, and loads of built-in peripherals.
The LeafLabs Maple 32-bit Arduino Compatible Microcontroller is a microcontroller board based on the STM32F103RB microprocessor. The Maple runs at a maximum of 72 MHz, has 39 digital input/output pins, 16 analog inputs, native full speed USB, 3 USARTs (hardware serial ports), integrated SPI/I2C support, a power jack, and a reset button. Maple is programmable over USB via provided DFU bootloader, no extra hardware required. Users can also program the onboard program flash via external JTAG interface. Maple offers security support for read/write protected addresses, as well as User and Handler processor modes. It has a real-time sysTick, useful for a real time OS or any timing senstitive applications. 6 advanced interrupt timers will help you here as well. Maple can be powered via USB, a wall adapter, or it can run off of a rechargeable lipo battery. The Maple is compatible with shields designed for the Arduino Duemilanove or Diecimila.

The Maple can be programmed using an Arduino-style, sketch-based programming environment, which is open-source and can be downloaded from the useful links tab.
http://www.robotshop.com/leaflabs-maple-32-bit-arduino-compatible-microcontroller-1.html

Arduino Mega 2560 ADK Microcontroller R3
• Microcontroller: ATmega2560
• Operating voltage: 5V
• Input Voltage (recommended): 7V to 12V
• Digital I/O pins: 54 (of which 14 provide PWM output)
• Revision 3 of the MEGA ADK
• Clock speed of 16 MHz
The Arduino Mega 2560 ADK Microcontroller is based on the ATmega2560. It has a USB host interface to connect with Android based phones, based on the MAX3421e IC and has number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. It is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. Each of the 50 digital pins on the ADK can be used as an input or output.
http://www.robotshop.com/arduino-mega-2560-adk-microcontroller.html

DFRduino MEGA 2560 ADK Microcontroller
• Microcontroller board based on the ATmega2560
• Fully compatible with Google's ADK
• Arduino Compatible
• ICSP header

The DFRduino MEGA 2560 ADK Microcontroller is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega2560, which is fully compatible with Google's ADK and it includes all the basics you need to start building your own Android accessories. It has 16 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button etc. It features an Atmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter.
http://www.robotshop.com/dfrduino-mega-2560-adk-microcontroller.html
« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 08:23:12 PM by Jhanananda »
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project. Please post your ideas.
« Reply #21 on: July 08, 2014, 08:41:23 AM »
HummingBoard is set to take a bite out of Raspberry Pi
Quote from: gizmag
Since shipping in 2012, Raspberry Pi boards have found themselves the brains of such diverse DIY projects as a mobile phone, a touchscreen computer or even a treat dispenser for the family dog. Now there are three new boys in town that promise faster processing, more system memory and more connectivity options. Yes indeed, SolidRun's new HummingBoard family has all the makings of a serious Pi killer.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: Data acquisitation. Microcontroler project
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2016, 06:50:40 PM »
I have recently been working with a guy I met locally, who happens to be into Arduino and Raspberry Pi controllers.  He runs a FaceBook forum on this subject called the ΅Cauliflower Brew Club

A few years ago I bought a Arduino Mega R3 USB Board with ATmega2560, but I had so many other things on my plate to deal with that I never got around to learning how to program it.

At that time I also purchased a Arduino Thermocouple Multiplexer Shield from Ocean Controls.  It is an 8 channel multiplexing k-type Thermocouple Multiplexer.

Today I received a Raspberry Pi 3.  The idea behind purchasing the Raspberry Pi 3 is for it to function as a front end to the Arduino Mega R3 USB Board with ATmega2560.  I hope to have it all running in a month.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)