Author Topic: battery technologies  (Read 3435 times)

Jhanananda

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battery technologies
« on: December 28, 2014, 08:35:15 AM »
Battery technology is undergoing a lot of improvements.  It will have to if solar is going to help solve the energy problem.  No matter what, batteries are going to be expensive.  I spent the last 2.5 years researching and evaluating these old and new battery technologies.  Lead-acid batteries currently are cheaper and more compact than most other competing battery technologies.

I have one solution, which is to use the excess power available at peek solar gain to pump water uphill to a reservoir, then when solar power drops below demand, then a valve opens on the uphill water reservoir, which sends water through a small-scale hydroelectric generator.  The water leaving the hydroelectric generator goes to a lower reservoir, where it will be pumped back uphill during the following day's peek solar gain hours.

The advantage of the water reservoir as a battery is the kinetic energy of water uphill can be stored indefinitely, as long as evaporation is very low.  Whereas, all other battery technologies lose stored power over time.

Another advantage of the water reservoir as a battery is as long as the plumbing and tanks are properly made and maintained, then the water reservoir as a battery can last for 50 years or more; whereas, most other battery technologies wear out in 5-20 years, depending upon the battery technology employed.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

mtrans

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2014, 12:34:09 PM »
I just read somethere,1 m3 of h2o on 300 meter high has 1kw,yes only one.
It`s somehow low but...just check.
I`ll improve my English

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2014, 05:10:06 PM »
Hi mtrans, that does not sound right, but then 1 cu meter (yrd) is not much water.  Most small scale hydroelectric systems depend upon a 25ft drop (7.6m) with a moderate flow rate through a 4" (10cm) pipe, which will deliver a steady 4KW.  This is roughly the equivalent of a small stream flow.  So, if one were to use a reservoir for storing the kinetic energy stored in water pumped uphill with excess solar energy, then one would need a fairly good sized pond, and pump, not just a 1 cu meter (yrd) tank.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Excalibur

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2014, 07:02:16 PM »
...as well as have a rain water catchment on the hill!
My problem is I don't have a hill on my property. What I do have is lots of permanent magnet stepper motors that do adapt nicely to DIY pelton wheels.. or wind turbines for that matter.

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2014, 08:35:36 AM »
Yes, the lack of a hill poses a serious problem.  It would also be useful to have a stream running across one's property with a 25 ft (7.6m)  drop across your property.  The advantage of the water reservoir as a battery is it can be applied at any scale, from small scale home owner with a hill to the scale of municipal power generation.  This is one way that solar could actually present a solution to peek grid demand by smoothing out the curve of demand upon the central generation plant by filling in with water pumped up hill during low demand.

Your mention of wind generators reminds me that every time it is cloudy here, then it is most often windy.  So, an off grid homestead would be better served if it had multiple sources of power generation, such as a wind generator in my case.  In fact I have been planning on buying one for the last 10 years that I have lived off of solar energy alone.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2015, 05:04:53 AM »
Battery technology definitely hampers solar growth, so a Tesla battery breakthrough could forever change how you power your home
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2015, 05:32:12 AM »
Here is another story on the Tesla battery, which is looking more like a lithium battery technology. Tesla Motors Announces A New Home Battery; Living Off The Grid Will Soon Be Status Quo
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2015, 05:19:42 AM »

Phones could soon be charged in less than a MINUTE: Experts build superfast and flexible power pack out of aluminium.
Quote from: daily mirror
    The flexible aluminium battery was created at Stanford University
    It consists of a negatively charged aluminium anode and a positively charged graphite cathode along with an ionic liquid electrolyte
    It sits in a flexible polymer-coated 'pouch' and recharges in one minute
    But it currently offers just half the voltage of existing lithium-ion batteries

This battery might be useful on a larger scale for solar applications.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2015, 04:40:55 PM »
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2015, 04:33:47 AM »
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2016, 09:40:28 AM »
Toyota battery breakthrough means magnesium could eventually replace lithium

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Engineers at the Toyota Research Institute of North America (TRINA) think they've found the secret to using magnesium in rechargeable batteries. This would replace lithium as a safer, more energy-dense option for batteries in everything from cell phones to cars.

Magnesium has been considered a potential replacement for lithium in rechargeable batteries for some time. Lithium is not stable in air and can combust when exposed, so to make lithium-ion batteries safer, the ions are reduced and the lithium is embedded into graphite rods. This reduces the amount of metal (reducing density), which limits the amount of power the li-ion battery can store. To increase density, engineers have toyed with the mix of lithium and graphite and the shape of the cells, but the balance is tricky.

Magnesium, on the other hand, is stable in the atmosphere and more potentially energy dense than is lithium in terms of storage. The trouble is, forming an electrolyte that doesn't degrade the magnesium while offering efficient transfer had proven difficult – until a chance discovery during research into hydrogen fuel cells changed that.

Magnesium might be stable in the air, but most people know, if it catches fire, it burns very hot.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2016, 09:23:47 AM »
DIY "junkyard battery" inspired by ancient blueprint stores energy cheaply
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Inspired by a millennia-old blueprint and two of the most abundant scrap metals in the US, scientists have developed a battery prototype that could one day offer a cheap and accessible way to store renewable energy off the grid. The steel-brass battery was crafted with materials you'd find in any old junkyard and can store energy at levels approaching lead-acid car batteries, with tests showing it can withstand years worth of charging cycles to boot.

While modern batteries weren't developed until the 19th century, some believe that the seeds of the technology were planted much earlier than that. The so-called Baghdad Battery represents a set of artifacts dating back to the first century BCE, consisting of a ceramic terracotta urn, a copper sheet and an iron rod. When they were discovered in 1930, so too were traces of an acidic agent like wine or vinegar, that may have served as a battery's electrolyte.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)

Jhanananda

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Re: battery technologies
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2016, 08:13:36 AM »
The glowing dye that could enable liquid-based batteries for powering homes and cars
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Researchers at the University at Buffalo say BODIPY – short for boron-dipyrromethene – hides two "unusual" chemical properties that make it a potential candidate for stockpiling energy in a redox flow battery: storing electrons and participating in electron transfer...

Redox flow batteries could potentially address this problem as their energy tanks can easily be enlarged to store vast amounts of energy without a corresponding exponential increase in cost, which is in contrast to other systems, such as Lithium-ion (Li-ion) technology. Although champions of flow technology say these batteries are safer and more cost-effective compared to the Li-ion variety, which currently dominates the market for battery-based energy storage systems, they have not been able to reach the same level of commercial success despite developments promising to lower costs and double energy density. Can BODIPY give redox flow batteries the jolt they need?

To test how well a BODIPY-based battery would run, the team dissolved PM 567, a powdered BODIPY dye, in a solvent and repeatedly charged and drained it for the duration of 100 cycles. They found that the compound was able to store and transfer electrons for the entire period without degrading, unlike many other chemicals. Although the researchers only tested PM 567, since different BODIPY varieties share chemical properties, based on the results, it is possible other dyes would be able to store energy just as well. Based on the test results, the researchers predict BODIPY batteries would be able to generate an estimated 2.3 volts of electricity.
I have run various blends of waste oils and unleaded gasoline since Feb, 2007 in a 1983 Chevy G-20 van with a 6.2L diesel V-8 engine, with a Stanadyne Rotary DB2 IP. I have started the engine with no difficulty on an 80/20 (WVO/gas) blend down to 3F (-16c).  I now run 60/20/20 (WVO/diesel/gas)